7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden

Blossom Lady
May 08, 2021 06:17 AM
7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden

Hummingbirds are known as the “winged jewels” of the garden. Small, colorful, and iridescent, hummingbirds are found all over the world. They weigh less than an ounce, and when they beat their wings at about 80 times per second while in flight, they make a delightful humming noise. Hummingbirds have a long, thin bill that they use to reach nectar from tubular flowers. Without a doubt, these little birds have become a gardener’s favorite friend because of their territorial antics and delightful personalities. Discover some of the proven tips to attract those little guests to your garden.

A hummingbird feeder

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
Maintaining a hummingbird feeder perfectly attracts the birds. Hang the feeder well away from predator access and near a water source.
Hummingbirds like exceptionally clean feeders. Change the nectar about every two weeks; wash them thoroughly with soap and water. Many experts suggest changing the nectar even more frequently—every three days or so. Watch your feeders carefully and keep them as clean as possible. While some people insist on boiling the nectar before placing it out, that is not absolutely necessary. Try shaking the water and sugar together until all the sugar melts. Put the feeders out in the garden very early—as soon as the snow melts—in order to have them available for early scout birds. If you get ants or bees invading the feeders, simply add a bit of petroleum jelly around the opening of each feeding hole or move your feeder to a different location.
How to make hummingbird nectar formula:
1. Mix 1 part organic sugar to 4 parts water.
2. Shake well or boil and let cool.
3. Pour into a clean hummingbird feeder.
4. Replace biweekly or whenever the feeder runs empty.
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Don’t use red dye in your nectar.

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
Even though hummingbirds are attracted to the color red (Tip #2), don’t put dye in their nectar.
This is because the effects of consuming red dye are unclear and studies have shown potential health consequences for hummers. And putting red dye in nectar is unnecessary to attract hummingbirds. Just make sure that the nectar feeder you purchase has a red top or base.
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Red is good

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
Hummingbirds are naturally attracted to the color red, which is the reason to grow red flowers and make a nectar feeder with red base or top.
At the very least, make sure it has a bright color like yellow.
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Grow plants they love

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
To attract and keep hummingbirds in your garden, it is important to grow plants they love.
Tubular flowers that enable a hummingbird to sup are good, and native plants are always the first choice. Research native plants that are suitable for your region at your local nursery. Consider planting other common hummingbird favorites such as gayfeather, cardinal flower, flowering tobacco, salvia, bee balm, catmint, columbine, coral bells, pincushion flowers, verbena, weigela, and zinnia.
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Don’t put honey or artificial sweeteners in your nectar.

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
It is not necessary and actually can be harmful to hummingbirds.
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Buy a feeder that prevents bees.

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
Many feeders are designed to make sure bees can’t get to the nectar. Look for feeding ports that are small enough that only hummingbird beaks can fit through. Second, most hummingbird feeders with a dish design work best to prevent bees. This is because the nectar sits below the port openings and is too far for bees to reach, but hummingbirds have no problem getting a drink.
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Try feeding a hummingbird from your hand.

7 Tips to Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden
Handheld nectar feeders are pretty cool, and hummingbirds are braver than you probably think. A little patience and perseverance can pay off big time!
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